international conferences 2012 Brisbane Institute Australia Brisbane Strengths based strategies Australia Strengths Strategies Institute Brisbane Australia Counselling Within Australia Brisbane Institute Contact Brisbane Institute Australia

Brisbane Institute Brochure Australia

Video Strengths Based Practice

Australia Strengths Based Practice Institute, Brisbane Institute

Strengths Strategies

Strengths

Approach

The Brisbane Institute

of Strengths Based

Practice

Brisbane Institute of Strengths Based Practice

 

Propagates, and Supports Strengths Based Human Resource Development

Through Strengths-Based Strategies, Appreciative Inquiry,

Asset Based Community Development and Counselling Approaches

 

CONFERENCES

2017

 

2016

17-19 June Bali, Indonesia

2014

Hyderabad Conference Brisbane Institute

Hyderabad Conference India

2012

Kathmandu Conference Nepal

2011

Sarajevo Conference 2011

Sarajevo Conference

Bosnia and Herzegovina

2010

Brisbane Institute of Strengths Based Practice Australia

Brisbane Conference

Queensland, Australia

2009

Coping Resilience International Conference Dubrovnik Brisbane Institute

Dubrovnik Conference Croatia

2006

Hyderabad Conference Brisbane Institute

Hyderabad Conference India

 

WORKSHOPS

Professor Lesley Chenoweth

A Charles Sturt University Initiative

 Curriculum Development on Environment Sustainability

in Social Work

Professor Lesley Chenoweth

Responding to the Challenges of Contemporary and Future Human Services - Beyond Survival to Proactive Change

The Role and Direction of Social Work and Human Services in the current Economic environment

Cooking for Social Work

New Zealand Workshops

Working With Challenging Clients: Motivation, Cooperation And Assisting Behaviour Change

workshops Sarajevo, Bosnia, Vive Zene, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina Workshops

 

Dr Venkat Pulla

AWARDED in India

 

3rd Right every Wrong Conclave

 

Brisbane Institute Brochure

PDF file- 275kb - open in new window

 

Brisbane Institute Strengths Strategies

Strengths Approach, Human Resource

Development, Social change, Transition societies, Role of youth, Entrepreneurship development, Governance and people strengthening practices, Volunteers development

Asset Based Community Development Micro credits and finance

 

 

Ignorance of Ability Brings Disability

"This is a short film I did in 2005

and it was nominated for

India-International Film Festival on disability ......"

georgepaul123

 

5.4 million Australians volunteer with that figure representing approximately 35% of the population. The estimated value of volunteering is $70 billion.
The complete survey report is available on the

Volunteering Australia website.

 

Coping Resilience & Hope Building, Asia Pacific Regional Conference,

Brisbane 9-11 July 2010

About Conference :: Abstracts ::  PAGE 1 - PAGE 2 - PAGE 3 - PAGE 4 - PAGE 5 - PAGE 6 - PAGE 7

Gallery

ASPIRE A PATHWAY TO MENTAL HEALTH INC. - Travis Radunz, Nick McGowen

Travis Radunz, Nick McGowenAspire A Pathway to Mental Health Inc. is an NGO service that is based in Southwest Victoria and state-wide in Tasmania. Whilst on the Aspire program in Tasmania participants are asked to develop an Overall Rehabilitation Goal using the Boston Model. Participants are encouraged by their support workers to build upon their strengths to achieve their goals. This in turn brings an increase in participant's motivation and hope for the future. The Tasmanian service was initiated in 2005, since November of that year Aspire has utilized the WHO's Quality of Life (WHOQoL) survey as a tool to quantitatively measure participant's perceived quality of life whilst being on our program. The results from WHOQoL data thus far have shown that a majority of participants have had an increase in their perceived quality of life in the areas of physical health, psychological health, social relationships and their environment. The presentation will be a brief explanation of Aspire, the Boston Model and how this contributes to the road to recovery. The conclusion will be an explanation of the WHOQoL tool in context with the Aspire program, with the statistics collected thus far from the WHOQoL survey being shown.
Biodata: Travis Radunz graduated with a Bachelor of Social Work with Honours in 2007 and has been working in Mental Health Rehabilitation with Aspire for 2 years. He has a strong interest in social justice and the consumer rights movement. tradunz@aspire.org.au
Biodata: Nick McGowen graduated with a Bachelor of Social Work in 2007. Since that time he has been working at Aspire. Nick has a passion for instilling hope in participants to see that recovery from a mental illness is not just possible but very achievable. nmcgowan@aspire.org.au
BUILDING COMMUNITY RESILIENCE FOR MITIGATION OF DISASTER; AN OVERVIEW - Dr. G. C. Mohanta

Dr. G C Mohanta is Director, Safety & Environmental EngineeringBuilding community resilience is one of the major challenges for the government, NGOs and social service organisations in the world. Resilience is the capacity of a community to survive, adapt and bounce back from a crisis or disaster. Resilience can be conceptualized along three dimensions physical, emotional and cultural. Physical resilience refers to the ability of a city or community to rebuild its physical structure. Emotional resilience refers to the ability of individuals, families and communities to cope and heal from trauma. Cultural resilience refers to the ability of customs, traditions, languages or religions to survive and evolve. Four properties of resilience are robustness (strength to withstand certain level of stress), rapidity (responding in a timely manner to contain loss and avoid disruption), redundancy (the extent to which elements, systems etc are substitutable), and resourcefulness (the capacity to identify problems, establish priorities and mobilize resources). To build community resilience, we should reduce the risk to individuals & communities; have in place social networks, leadership & accountability, cooperation & coordination, clearly defined mandates, communication & transparency, fairness, continuous learning, belief systems, conducive environment & lifestyle, infrastructure & support services, positive outlook, sense of purpose and diverse & innovative economy.
Bioadata: Dr. G C Mohanta is Director, Safety & Environmental Engineering and Director, Planning & Resources in Defence Research & Development Laboratory, Hyderabad, India. He has 35 years experience in Planning, Production and Human Resource Management, Safety & Environmental Engineering. mohantag@yahoo.com
ONLINE NETWORKS: EXPLORING THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITIES IN ENHANCING RESILIENCE - Lisa Papatraianou & Ed Carson

Lisa Papatraianou & Ed CarsonResearch over the past decade has investigated organisational or workplace resilience to address high attrition rates of human service professionals. Previous research has concerned teachers, social workers, child protection workers and nurses, focusing on exploring the links between worker resilience; the successful navigation of workplace challenges; and workers continuing in their chosen professions. Organisational processes such as mentoring, professional development, on the job training and supervisory practices are captured in research as resilience enhancing, while informal processes, such as the knowledge gained from each other through professional communities, are not often explicitly documented. The shift in landscape of social interactions to online formats requires further research. This paper considers how formal and informal knowledge generation and transmission can be mediated by various modes of communication among workers and their contacts. In particular, it explores the permeability of professional communities by examining whether online communication encourages workers to share workplace practices with non-professionals. This paper concludes by drawing on Granovetter's theory of 'the strength of weak ties' to explore the informal consolidation processes of formal knowledge, in an effort to understand how online networks can foster worker resilience and influence worker retention.
Bioadata: Lisa Papatraianou is a PhD candidate at the School of Education, University of South Australia. Lisa currently tutors and provides research assistance. Her research interests include human resilience, teacher resilience, social aspects of technology, online research ethics and qualitative research methods. lisa.papaanou@.unisa.edu.au
Biodata: Ed Carson is Professor of Social Policy at University of South Australia.

WHAT'S HOPE GOT TO DO WITH IT: COPING, RESILIENCE AND HOPE FOR MOTHERS OF A CHILD WITH DISABILITY? - Lorelei Carpenter and elke emerald

Lorelei Carpenter and elke emerald This paper is an exploration of the theoretical grounds of resilience and hope. In our previous work with women who mother children with ADHD or ASD we found that many women are themselves disabled by their child's disability; they are isolated, marginalised and silenced (Carpenter & emerald 2009; Carpenter & Austin 2007). Yet, these women persevere in the face of the ongoing challenges of mothering a child with a disability. We now ask: is this resilience they show, or hope or is it something else again? Using a narrative inquiry methodology we reflect on the women's experience and focus on one particular case study: Coralie speaks of resilience, hope and belief as she copes with the challenges presented through mothering her son, Adam. For Coralie, hope enables her to envision a future for her son yet she told us “It is more than hope”. Her working definition of hope captures the sense that the hope has to be realistic and this introduces a deeper foundation to her resilience. We use her story to unpack the meaning of coping, resilience and hope for Coralie and reflect on resilience and hope for the many women we met. A deliberate aim of our work is to celebrate these remarkable women and give them voice.
Biodata: Dr Lorelei Carpenter teaches in special education and educational counselling at Griffith University School of Education and Professional Studies. Her recent research examines the social and political conditions of mothering, especially in the context of a child with disability. Dr Carpenter is currently examining the concept of resilience in this context. l.carpenter@griffith.edu.au
Biodata: elke emerald teaches in research methodology and communication at Griffith University School of Education and Professional Studies. The recently published book Stories from the Margin with colleague, Dr Lorerlei Carpenter, examines the context of mothering a child with ADHD or ASD. elke emerald formerly published as Helena Austin. e.emerald@griffith.edu.au

BUILDING EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE BY WORKING WITH THE BODY: A BODY PSYCHOTHERAPY APPROACH TO TRAUMA RESOLUTION - Andrea Alexander

Andrea Alexander Body PsychotherapistThe field of body orientated psychotherapy has gained considerable interest over the past decade and made significant contribution to the understanding of trauma. The body is affected by trauma and has a central role in resolving the trauma. Helplessness and lack of hope are common states in the trauma victim and gaining control of their body, emotions and mind is a vital part of the healing process. This presentation examines how working with the body can be taken a step further in recovery by going beyond body awareness and fully engaging the body in the healing process. Working in this way empowers the client as they can practise the physical exercises on their own with outcomes such as feeling vibrantly alive, hopeful, confident and more joyful. A key focus is awareness of the body's innate restorative ability and actively encouraging it to heal by using specialised trauma release exercises. Methods introduced will include examples of physical exercises that induce shaking and trembling, discharge the freeze response, and restore emotional resiliency and physical confidence. Case studies using these techniques will be discussed together with cross cultural and clinical application.
Biodata: Andrea Alexander is a Body Psychotherapist. Andrea's interest in trauma sparked when studying Core Energetics Body Psychotherapy ten years ago, and it has since become a passion. She has attended workshops internationally, exploring the latest trauma resolution techniques. andreaalexander@optusnet.com.au
THE IMPORTANCE OF HOPE IN COPING WITH CATASTROPHIC INJURY - Pat Dorsett

Pat Dorsett senior lecturer Griffith UniversityThis paper presents research findings about the role of hope in the coping process related to adjustment following catastrophic injuries such as spinal cord injury. Qualitative findings about the role of hope from the perspective of the person with spinal cord injury will be discussed. This data was collected as part of a ten year longitudinal year study of an Australian sample of 46 people who sustained spinal cord injury. Respondents were interviewed at discharge from hospital 6, 12, 24, 36, months post discharge and again at ten years post discharge. The interviews consisted of a semi structured qualitative interview focusing on the adjustment process. It was found that 73% of the participants identified hope as an essential factor that helped them following their injury. Three main foci of hope emerged from the data set: 1.Hope for a full and complete recovery 2.Hope for a cure for spinal cord injury 3.Hope for a future life that was satisfying. For many hope continued to be important in helping them cope with the long-term consequences of their injuries. The respondents identified the importance of hope in their overall adjustment and coping process. Implications for working with people who sustain catastrophic injuries such as spinal cord injury are discussed.
Biodata: Pat Dorsett is senior lecturer in the Griffith University, School of Human Services and Social Work with extensive experience in working with people with spinal cord injury. Her research interests include the links between the coping process and rehabilitation outcomes for people with severe acquired disability. P.dorsett@griffith.edu.au
RECOVERY AND EMPOWERMENT: LETTING THE BODY LEAD - Karen Fagerstorm

Dr. Karen Fagerstrom, psychologist from Berkeley, CaliforniaExperiences that generate hope and counter helplessness contribute to recovery from trauma. In coping with hardship, trauma and loss, people benefit when they can be active or take action to help restore their sense of personal agency and effectiveness. Activities that provide immediate, noticeable positive effects in sense of wellbeing and that promote restoration and recovery of “self” counteract the sense of powerlessness identified with trauma. What kinds of programs help people to be active players in their own recovery, calling on their own strengths and capacities in the service of repairing damage and building a preferred future?
There is growing interest in therapeutic programs featuring physical activities that are recreational and skill building. Yoga programs serve a spectrum from war veterans to domestic abuse victims. Skiing, hiking and biking programs are developed for soldiers recovering from traumatic injuries (both physical and emotional) as well as for underserved, disadvantaged or troubled youth. Surveying a range of such programs, I will consider underlying rational for these as well as cross cultural issues relating to adaptability to many settings. I will explore evidence that such programs aid significantly in recovery from trauma and discuss these programs as examples of “strengths oriented” strategies.
Biodata: Dr. Karen Fagerstrom, psychologist from Berkeley, California, has specialized in working with divorcing families. Additionally, working internationally with an INGO, she developed and directed peacebuilding summer camp programs for children of diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds in the war-torn Balkans. kfagerstrom@gmail.com
PSYCHOLOGICAL STRENGTHS AND HEALTH OF PEOPLE OVER 65 YEARS LIVING IN THE COMMUNITY - Coralie Graham

Coralie Graham, Lecturer, Registered PsychologistThe potential for spiraling health care costs of the ageing baby boomer cohort has provided impetus for research into this group. Overseas research indicates a positive association between a number of psychological strengths and health. The current triangulated 2 Phase study investigates the psychological strengths that older adults use to maintain their health and quality of life. This methodology provided a deeper insight into the concepts and cross validation of results. The analysis of the interviews of 10 older adults in Phase 1 found that adaptability, positive outlook, social connectedness, and spirituality, in addition to receipt of support services were important to maintaining health, quality of life and the ability for over 65 to remain independent in their own home and community. The quantitative Phase 2 of this study investigated the degree of relationship between resilience, optimism and health and surveyed 620 older adults by mail. Data analysis using multiple regression, identified resilience as a predictor of better self reported mental and physical health. Research indicates that multiple strengths are able to be enhanced with minimal intervention, and their positive relationship with health status, the potential for flow on financial savings in the promotion of health and satisfaction is huge.
Biodata: Coralie Graham, Lecturer, is a Registered Nurse and Registered Psychologist, by training undertaking her PhD at the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland. Coralie combines her interest in health of older adults and positive psychology. grahamco@usq.edu.au
I'VE STOPPED WAITING: MOVING FORWARD AFTER ESTRANGEMENT FROM AN ADULT CHILD - Kylie Agllias

Kylie Agllias social work lecturerThe experience of being “cut-off” or estranged from an adult-child can be devastating. It is characterised by loss of emotional intimacy, lack of contact, and the relationship being viewed as unsatisfactory. It is an ambiguous loss because the adult-child is physically absent, but also psychologically or emotionally present in the older parent's life. It is a loss that is rarely recognised by others, and there are no social rituals to mark the grief associated with it. Ambiguous loss and disenfranchised grief are powerful barriers to coping and grieving. This paper will report on findings from an interpretive phenomenological study with twenty-six participants aged over 60 years, who were estranged from an adult-child. Participants stated that the effects of estrangement never fully dissipated, but over time most had started to accept their inability to change the situation. They spoke about a number of strategies that helped them to live a good life and to deal with the absence of their child (and in many cases grandchildren). These included; establishing boundaries, minimising triggers for pain, keeping busy, and nurturing relationships with special people.
Biodata: Kylie Agllias is a social work lecturer and doctoral candidate at the University of Newcastle, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Australia. Her doctoral topic is the experience of family estrangement in later life. Kylie.Agllias@newcastle.edu.au
COMMUNITY DESIGNED ICT'S FOR BUILDING RESILIENCE: THE GRANITENET PROJECT - Kath McLachlan and Christine King

Kath McLachlan, Christine King Rural communities, such as Stanthorpe in SW Queensland have faced challenges on social, environmental, cultural and economic fronts, and found the means to “bounce back” from adversity. From 2003 2006 “A Stanthorpe study” was conducted by a collaborative research team (Hegney, Ross, Baker, Rogers-Clark, King, Buikstra et.al. 2008), which identified personal and community resilience factors that enhance psychological wellness. This paper explores the occurrence of these eleven identified factors in relation to another collaborative participatory action research project that began in 2006, that aims to build capacity and strengthen resilience through the use of ICT. The GraniteNet project is a “grass roots” initiative that has used “insider' and “outsider” expertise to create the vision of “A sustainable community designed, owned and managed portal, www.granitenet.com.au that will support Stanthorpe's development as a learning community.” Lifelong learning principles underpin the portal concept, enhancing community connectedness through a user friendly interface and content management system.
Biodata: Kathryn McLachlan is a Community Development Worker in Stanthorpe, a small rural town in S/W Queensland, and a PhD candidate with the University of Queensland. Kath has been involved with the re-development of GraniteNet, a community website portal, www.granitenet.com.au cdskath@halenet.com.au
Biodata: Dr Christine King is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland, specializing in participatory RD&E in agriculture and resource management. She has worked on ACIAR / AusAID projects in Cambodia, India and The Pacific Islands, leading teams of experts. christine.king@uq.edu.au

 

ALL SPEAKERS ABSTRACTS PDF File

About Conference :: Abstracts ::  PAGE 1 - PAGE 2 - PAGE 3 - PAGE 4 - PAGE 5 - PAGE 6 - PAGE 7

Gallery

copyright @ The Brisbane Institute of Strengths Based Practice (Inc)                                                                                                                                                   web libero

SHARE YOUR SKILLS - Volunteer Overseas

AVID assignments - http://www.volunteering.scopeglobal.com/assignments